Tag Archives: brooklyn brewery

NYC Homebrewers Guild Anniversary Party

brews100118_250

It’s tired maxim, but I’ll trot it out again: Today’s homebrewers are tomorrow’s professional brewers, the men and women who will one day craft your favorite new IPA, gose or some other style that has yet to be invented or dredged from the history books.

Getting a taste of these beers typically requires you to be buddies with the brewer. (Or if you’re in New York City, attending my homebrew tour.) But on Saturday, November 2, you’ll have the chance to sample your way the most dizzying—and dizzyingly delicious—collection of homebrew the city has ever seen.

That night, the Brooklyn Brewery will be taken over by the New York City Homebrewers Guild for its 25th anniversary party. (Fun fact: Brooklyn brewmaster Garrett Oliver was a founding member.) To celebrate, the guild has enlisted clubs from across the city to pour their homebrewed creations. From Brooklyn Brewers to Brewstoria (Queens, that is), this event will welcome a stunning array of brewers from across the city—more than 65 different beers and counting.

You’ll be treated to free samples of the homebrews, as well as an unlimited buffet of Brooklyn Brewery beers. But act fast. Tickets are just $25 and they’re going fast. You don’t want to miss out on tasting the future of beer in New York City.

What: NYC Homebrewers Guild 25th Anniversary Party
When: Saturday, November 2, 9 p.m.
Where: Brooklyn Brewery
Tickets: $25. Buy them here.

Announcing: The Complete Beer Course Release Party

ReleaseParty_CBC_web
On September 10 at 7:30 p.m., come join drinkers and thinkers at the Brooklyn Brewery as we proudly host the release party for The Complete Beer Course, Brooklyn author Joshua M. Bernstein’s comprehensive guide to enjoying and understanding mankind’s greatest beverage—in our humble opinion, at least.

To celebrate, Brooklyn Brewery will be opening up 10 draft lines and popping bottles of its award-winning Belgian-style beers. Snacks will be served to keep hunger at bay. Josh will be on hand to sign books and drink his body weight in beer.

Tickets will be available in two tiers:

* If you’re just down to drink, the $15 ticket will get you unlimited Brooklyn Brewery beer.

* The $30 ticket will get you unlimited Brooklyn Brewery beer and a copy of The Complete Beer Course (a $25 value).

To purchase tickets, please visit Brown Paper Tickets. Unfortunately, we are sold out.

Drink the Devil’s Plaything at Salvation Taco

Devil's PlaythingThe Devil’s Plaything, a spicy, citrusy IPA brewed by Greenport Harbor.

When I was a kid I feverishly collected baseball cards, spending my allowance on Donruss, Topps and Upper Deck packs in search of, say, a Ken Griffey, Jr., rookie. As the years disappeared, my accumulations switched to CDs and buttons, before settling on today’s primary fixation: beer. My days are spent seeking out novel new flavors, maybe a beer flavored with mustard seeds or oysters—even the Rocky Mountain variant.

Though I do savor trying new flavors, I don’t want to dedicate all my waking hours (and income) to acquiring lusted-after ales such as Three Floyds’ Dark Lord Imperial Stout or the Alchemist’s Heady Topper. After all, there’s plenty of unusual, singular beer awaiting at bars and restaurants around New York City.

To both facilitate finely tuned food pairings and set themselves apart, haunts around New York have partnered with breweries to craft exclusive, one-of-a-kind beers. Head to Shake Shack, and you can have Brooklyn Brewery’s biscuity ShackMeister amber ale, while Astoria’s Strand Smokehouse has Hank, a juniper berry–spiced lager developed by SingleCut Beersmiths

Still, perhaps New York’s biggest proponents of proprietary beer are restaurateur Ken Friedman and chef April Bloomfield, who helm some of the city’s hottest restaurants: gastropub trailblazer the Spotted Pig, the carnivore-focused Breslin, seafood-centric John Dory Oyster Bar and madcap Mexican Salvation Taco. Though all the cuisines and concepts are distinct, the common thread is a commitment to offering a specially designed house beer.

“For us, it’s a nice way to provide guests with something different,” says Bill Brooks, The Breslin Bar & Dining Room’s beer manager. “I really like going to craft beer bars and seeing what’s new.”

If you head to the Breslin and Spotted Pig, you can sample Brooklyn Brewery’s British-inspired Spotted Pig Bitter. (The Breslin also serves the aromatic, Captain Lawrence–crafted Revolutionary Sweetheart.) At the John Dory you’ll find Sixpoint‘s Oyster Stout, which is made with plenty of the restaurant’s leftover bivalve shells (they add an appealing minerality), as a well a refreshing blonde ale brewed in conjunction with Syracuse’s Empire.

But with summer weather settling into the city, methinks you’ll want to beeline to Salvation Taco’s rooftop to try the restaurant group’s latest proprietary beer: Greenport Harbor‘s Devil’s Plaything, a citrusy IPA flavored with limes, oranges, dried Haitian bitter orange segments and chiles. “Instead of going the historical route, we thought about taking a style of beer that we really like and tweak it,” says Brooks, who worked on the beer with ST’s beverage director Sam Anderson.

The project was born out of admiration. Brooks had long been a fan of Greenport’s hoppy ales, such as the Black IPA, Citrus IPA and bright, balanced Otherside IPA. So when Brooks was batting around ideas with Anderson about making an IPA syrup for cocktails with Serrano chiles, the right brewery for the project was a no-brainer.

“I called up John [Liegey, Greenport Harbor’s cofouder and -owner) and said, ‘We’ve got a crazy idea for a beer at the rooftop of the Taco,’” Brooks recalls. Greenport Harbor was game to fashion its first proprietary beer, cranking out a 60-barrel batch (enough to ensure a steady supply deep into the summer). At the end of May, Devil’sPlaything debuted at Salvation Taco’s sky-scraping lounge atop the Pod 39 Hotel.

While the sessionable IPA (5.2 percent ABV) is an ideal thirst-quencher on a mercury-spiking afternoon (like, say, today), it pulls double duty in the dining department, going divinely with tacos. The devil, they say, is in the details.

Devil’s Plaything is available for $8 at Salvation Taco. You can also found it on tap at Greenport Harbor’s tasting room. This story originally appeared on my Craft Beer New York app.

Welcome to the Year of the Craft-Beer Tall Boy

Now you can try that with a 16-ounce craft beer! Photo: Flickr/ALittaM

In my early, drunken twenties, not long after I shook my cost-driven affection for forty-ouncers of malt liquor, I fell under the sway of a tall boy. Well, perhaps I should say tall boys, because there’s no way I could glug just one 16-ounce can of beer.

Unlike the standard 12-ounce can, the tall boy has serious heft. It feels substantial, an honest pint for an honest price. But as my tastes morphed over the years, from mass-produced watery lagers to bitter IPAs and roasty stouts, I left the tall boy in my rearview mirror. You see, tall boys were the territory of Bud and Coors. Craft beer held no quarter in tall aluminum cylinders.

In recent years though, craft breweries have begun reclaiming the can, which keeps beer fresher by sealing it off from destructive light and oxygen. First came the 12-ounce vessels, which are now populated by Brooklyn Brewery, New Belgium and Oskar Blues, whose hoppy Dale’s Pale Ale trailblazed the crush-it-against-your-head category. Now comes the next step in the metal revolution: Craft beer in 16-ounces cans.

Be still my beating heart. This year, 16-ouncers stuffed with sublime craft brews are poised to take the mainstream leap. The next big thing in beer is, well, big beers. Here are five of our favorite tall boys to try. Continue reading