Tag Archives: Beer

July Writing: The Round-up

Photo credit: Brooklyn Magazine

Photo credit: Brooklyn Magazine

Fine readers!

Hope everyone is doing well. Over the last few months, I have written words. So many words! So very many words, which I have turned into paychecks that in turn are used to afford life essentials, such as rent, diapers for my daughter and beer. Beer! That’s why you’re here. To read stories about beer. And I will not disappoint. Here’s a sampling of what I’ve been up to, story-wise. P.S. Let me know if any of these tales tickle your fancy.

Imbibe, “Back to the Land”: Farmers, brewers and farmer-brewers are growing a new crop of truly local beers.

Draft, “The Power of One”: In a harried world packed with pairing suggestions, what’s the best multipurpose beer?

Draft, “Riding the (R)ales”: The train’s your ticket to unforgettable beer adventures.

Men’s Journal, “The 10 Best Shandy and Radler Beers”: Don’t get stuck drinking subpar citrus-infused beer.

Men’s Journal, “America’s Most Patriotic Craft Beers”: DRINK UP FREEDOM!

Wine Enthusiast, “Beat the Heat Beers”: You’ll want to sip these all summer long.

Wine Enthusiast, “Meet Your Favorite Warm-Weather Beer”: Hello, kölsch!

Wine Enthusiast, “Is the IPA Trend Losing Steam?”: Short answer: no. Long answer: read ahead.

Brooklyn Magazine, “A Guide to Summer Drinking in Brooklyn”: How, where and what to sip in my home borough. P.S. I did plenty of research.

Realtor.com, “Love Beer? Of Course You Do. Now It’s Time to Put a Kegerator in Your Kitchen”: Well, that’s a pretty explanatory title.

Eater, “Beer Review: Firestone Walker Pivo Pils Is Pure, Cold Comfort”: Did you know that I write a monthly review column for Eater? Now you do!

Eater, “Beer Review: Ballast Point’s Grapefruit Sculpin Is a Beer All IPA Fans Should Try”:

Eater, “Beer Review: 21st Amendment’s Down to Earth is an Easy-Drinking Modern IPA” 

Eater, “Beer Review: Hopworks’ Totally Radler is the Perfect Low-Alcohol Summer Brew” 

Boston, “Bubbling Up”: My essay on how the Northeast got its brewing mojo back.

Take Part, “Malthouse Rising”: It’s the rise of truly local beer. 

Van Winkle’s, “Just 10,000 Miles to Mongolia”: Spoiler alert: It’s no fun to sleep next to a night-screamer,

Bon Appétit, “March Is a Tricky Time to Drink Beer, so Drink Bière de Mars”: The French farmhouse ale is just the ticket to that time of year.

Bon Appétit, “Better Together: Why Brewers Are Collaborating to Make New Beers”: The answer: creativity.

Bon Appétit, “The Beer for People Who Don’t Think They Like Craft Beer”: It’s time you tried a Munich helles.

Bon Appétit, “Craft Beer Trends to Look Out for in 2015”: Hello, German hops.

Bon Appétit, “For an Extra Caffeine Fix, Try Beer With Coffee”: Uppers and downers, united in the same glass.

Bon Appétit, “Breweries Are the Hot New Spot for Restaurant Pop-Ups”: Some of the best food is now found in breweries.

Bon Appétit, “Breweries Look Beyond the Beer and to… Murals?!”: For artists, brewery walls are the best new canvases for artists.

Bon Appétit, “Pound the Pavement and Some Brews: The Intersection of Running and Beer”: How else are you going to stay in shape?

October Writing Round-up

Drunken Vagrant_WriterOctober already, eh? These days are certainly disappearing in a beer-soaked whirlwind of hops, changing my daughter’s diapers and travel. So much travel! From Maine to Colorado, the last month has been crazy pants. Compound that with a cold, a case of food poisoning and walking Sammy Bernstein, and it’s been a busy slate. Through it all, I’ve been clacking out stories. Here’s a sampling of my latest stories. Happy reading. And drinking, too.

First We Feast, “Two Roads Lil’ Heaven”: Yup, I’m drinking session beers with my daughter.

Men’s Journal, “(Highly) Experimental Beer Styles Worth Trying”: At Denver’s Great American Beer Festival, there’s no shortage of odd beers.

Bon Appétit, “Why You Need to Drink Wet-Hopped Beers Right Now”: Beer today, gone tomorrow—my take on fall’s most ephemeral beer style.

 Bon Appétit, “How Much Is Too Much? More on America’s Surfeit of Craft Beer”: IPAs have become our country’s finest export.

Bon Appétit, “Surviving the Great American Beer Fest: Hoppy IPAs to Candy-Bar Beers”: Wandering around the GABF gives you a good chance to see which way America’s hoppy winds are blowing.

Details.com, “Color Correction: The Fall’s Beers Are Red, Not Brown”: Brown ales? Old news. This fall, it’s time to drink red IPAs.

Beer Connoisseur, “For the Love of Gourd”: Pumpkin beers have broken free from their seasonal shackles, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

Wine Enthusiast, “A Grown-Up’s Guide to Oktoberfest”: You don’t have to get blindingly drunk to have a blast at Oktoberfest.

 

August Articles: The Update

It’s time you had a beer. Willie approves. 

Howdy, friends. Summer has been a tilt-a-whirl of travel, from staying at a girls’ camp outside Portland, Maine, to riding on Sierra Nevada’s Beer Camp bus in California, camping in Cooperstown, spending a week on Fire Island and, well, sleeping in a shack in Richmond, Virginia. Through all the travel, I’ve been writing like crazy. Seriously, I can’t remember a summer when I’ve penned so many stories.

That might explain why I really, really need a break. This Labor Day weekend, I’m looking forward to spending the majority of my time pants-less, drinking beer—which isn’t really so different from my day-to-day life, you know. Pants stifle creativity! Or maybe I’m just lazy. Which could also be the case.

Anyhoo! Without further ado, here are the highlights from my last few months of stories. Read away!

First We Feast, “Beer With Baby: Evil Twin Nomader Weisse”: Yup, I’m getting drunk with my daughter.

First We Feast, “Beer With Baby: Victory Summer Love”: Still getting drunk with my daughter.

First We Feast, “Beer With Baby: Modern Times Blazing World”: Man, how drunk can I get with my daughter?

Bon Appétit, “10 Great Beer Lover’s Hotels Across America, from Vermont to California”Drinking beer and passing out has never been simpler.

 Bon Appétit, “How (Good) American Beers Are (Finally) Conquering Europe”: IPAs have become our country’s finest export.

 Bon Appétit, “You Should Be Drinking These Belgian-Style Beers Right Now”: I also include a gose and a Berliner weisse. But still: start drinking.

Draft, “Metal Head: The Tale of Woody Chandler”: Pennsylvania’s Woody Chandler is on a quest to drink canned beer. All of them.

Wine Enthusiast, “America’s Five Best Beer Cities”: Want to get people riled up? Make a list. And don’t include their city.

Men’s Journal, “Sierra Nevada Beer Camp”: I rode on the bus. And drank so, so much beer.

Imbibe, “What Does Craft Really Mean”: My cover story tackles the thorny question: What does craft beer really mean these days?   

The Rise of Gruit Beer

Gruits_Bernstein

It’s my new story! Photo: Instagram

One of brewing’s fundamental rules is that beer is comprised of malted grain, water, yeast and hops. Grains supply the fermentable sugars that yeast convert into alcohol, while hops provide balancing bitterness, preservative prowess, flavor and aroma. Today, hops are nearly as crucial to beer as water, especially in this IPA-crazed era. But if you were to time-travel to visit medieval brewers, you’d discover that beer contained nary a hop.

Back then, beers were seasoned with gruit (pronounced “grew-it” or “groot”), which was a proprietary blend of herbs such as bitter and astringent yarrow (a flowering plant), wild rosemary and resinous, eucalyptus-like wild gale (a.k.a. bog myrtle), along with sundry spices. In large quantities, gruit was considered a euphoric stimulant and an aphrodisiac, and brewers often slipped in hallucinogens to enhance the effects. By the 1700s, whether due to health concerns or religious pressure, gruit was largely phased out in favor of hops. No longer.

Increasingly, craft brewers are ditching hops for herbs, creating adventurous gruits that challenge beer’s basic definition. For this month’s Imbibe, I tackled the growing trend of brewers using offbeat herbs and spices that’ll challenge your very definition of beer.

Check out the article right about…here.

My Bia Hoi Honeymoon in Vietnam

Bia Hoi_Bernstein

In Hanoi, about 25 cents buys you a tall, cool glass of fresh, and refreshing, bia hoi. Photo: my Instagram feed.

It merely took me 33 years, but back in August 2011 I joined the ranks of married men. Our wedding in seafaring Portland, Maine, was a raucous affair, with my wife and I turning our rehearsal dinner into a booze cruise and holding our party in a dive bar with two light-up disco dance floors. (We love you, Bubba’s Sulky Lounge.) And there was beer. Oh, so much beer!

Given my hops-soaked line of work, I wanted beer to play key role in our honeymoon. In lieu of Brussels, we booked a flight to Hanoi, where the local specialty is bia hoi—fresh, low-alcohol, rice-driven beer. The cost: about a quarter a glass. In other words, heaven.

For Draft, I recently penned a story on our beer-filled honeymoon. Check out the story right about…here.

Drinking Beer While Parenting: The Primer

beerparenting-2

These days, my identity is a bit muddled. Professionally, I’m a beer journalist and author, but I’m also a parent to my newborn, Violet. How do I reconcile drinking with caring for my daughter? You want to do, uh, research, but you also don’t want to have Jell-O arms and end up dropping your daughter. That’ll merit a house call from the department of children’s services, that’s for certain. So what’s the solution? To find out the answer, check out my article on First We Feast. It’s a fun read, even if you don’t have kids.

 

The Rise of Culinary Brewing

stout_5Photography: Jon Edwards

Do these pictures make you hungry? That’s the point! For this month’s issue of Draft magazine, I investigate the growing trend of culinary in brewing. In a simpler era, brewers mainly relied on hops, grain, water and yeast to create an endless range of ales and lagers. But for modern brewers, the power of four tends to bore.

Seeking out new flavors, brewers are digging into their pantries and refrigerators. Though you can add edibles to nearly any beer style (Ballast Point’s Habañero Sculpin IPA, Elysian’s Super Fuzz blood orange pale ale, Sam Adams’ beef-heart-fueled, Oktoberfest-inspired Burke in a Bottle), the most popular platforms are the stout and porter. Typically, brewers played up their roasty, cocoalike characteristics by incorporating coffee or chocolate. Now they’re turning to bacon, peanut butter, pretzels and even oysters to devise dark beers as curious as they are curiously delicious.

Care to read the full story? Check it out over at Draft.